Genelec provides acoustic solution for EMI Publishing Studios - Audio Media International

Genelec provides acoustic solution for EMI Publishing Studios

Company's 8240 and 8250 monitors make "massive improvement" to London recording facility's audio setup.
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London recording facility EMI Publishing Studios is now fully equipped with Genelec active monitors.

The site houses two UAD-2 powered Pro Tools mixing rooms, which surround an intimate live room. Large consoles are flanked by a selection of classic outboard effects, assorted in-house guitars, amps, drums and a Moog Little Phatty. However, when it emerged that monitoring wasn’t up to scratch, Scott McCormick (pictured), EMI engineer, called in Source Distribution to assess the situation.

“We’ve always struggled a touch with the acoustics in our studios here, but the Genelecs that Source allowed us to trial made a massive improvement,” said McCormick. “We now have the 8240s in Studio B and a set of 8250s in Studio A. Both studios can be acoustically difficult but the Genelecs were a massive help.”

Genelec’s 8240A bi-amplified monitoring system is a compact yet powerful setup that is perfectly suited to a space such as EMI’s Studio B. It is able to provide a wide frequency response in even the tightest of spaces and has the ability to out-perform many much larger systems.

“We are getting great levels of bass out of them comparable to our big, flush mounted three-ways and they are worth three grand and are twice the size,”McCormick continued. “Even with the DSP on we aren’t getting any fatigue, the frequencies are full and it makes mixing easy.”

With such a high turnover of producers recording at Rathbone Place, it became increasingly important for Scott to source a monitoring system that was accessible and, at the same time, could deliver on performance. Producers would tend to use Studio A and B for two- or three-day sessions, and previously would have had to constantly adjust bass levels.

“It’s a huge concern with a lot of the producers we work with,” commented McCormick. “If they work on a really bassy setup, for example, and when they play their tracks on an outside system, it sounds terrible. A great thing about the DSP on these is that it doesn’t flatter the sound. We know that when we export tracks recorded here, the sound that is produced will be accurate to the recording.”

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