dLive manages The Professionals' reunion gig

Console was used for the band's recent sold-out concert – their first performance together for 30 years.
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Allen & Heath’s new dLive digital mixing system was recently used to manage The Professionals’ sold-out reunion gig at London’s 100 Club.

The gig marked the first time in over 30 years that the recently reformed iconic punk rock band, made up of ex members of the Sex Pistols, had appeared, coinciding with Universal’s release of ‘The Complete Professionals’ CD set.

As space was tight and channel count relatively low, engineer, Ben Hammond, opted for the smallest hardware from the dLive range - a S3000 surface and DM32 stage rack - fitted with a Dante networking card, to manage FOH, monitors, and a multitrack recording of the show. Requirements comprised drums, bass, two guitars, four vocals, four wedge mixes, and stereo and multitrack recording via Dante to Reaper, to be mixed later for a ‘live’ release.

“I needed to deliver an edgy, driven mix to suit the type of music. dLive is an extremely clean sounding console, and the move to 96kHz processing gives so much more space and headroom, which enabled me to get the sound I was looking for pretty quickly,” explained Hammond. “I tried to keep the mix as open and raw as I could, just utilising the desk’s brilliant built-in FX, which mean I don’t need to rely on plug-ins or outboard. As usual, I use a lot of sub groups, this came from learning to mix in a tiny venue with very underpowered monitoring, so I was back home here!”

Any compression or heavy EQ cuts were done on Groups so Hammond could retain the maximum level available for the monitors. Allen & Heath says the dLive handles this well due to the number of processing mix channels available, as well as additional FX sends, monitor sends, and matrix outs.

“The gig ended on a great note, the audience were ecstatic, the band very happy, and looking forward to their next outing. It was a real honour to work with someone with as much history and impact in music as Paul Cook,” concluded Hammond.

http://www.allen-heath.com/

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